What’s the Librarian Reading Now? You Are The Music.


Mr Bull is currently reading You Are The Music, by Victoria Williamson.

Dr. Victoria Williamson is a post-doctoral research fellow at Sheffield University and one of the world’s foremost researchers on the Psychology of Music. In this, her first book, she explores the complex relationships between music and our brains. She poses such questions as:

  • Do babies remember music from the womb?
  • Can music help with exercise or recovery from illness?
  • What is going on in your brain when that certain song transports you back to teenage years.

For more Psychology and Music information and latest developments check out Vicky’s Blog here.

For more info on Vicky and her other publications and research interests check out the link below.

vicky pic

 

 

 

 

 

 

What’s the Librarian Reading Now?


Mr Bull is currently reading The Winter Book by Tove Jansson.

Tove Jansson is best known perhaps for her children’s book series featuring The Moomins. The first of these eight books appeared in 1945 (The Moomins and the Great Flood) and the final novel wasn’t published until 1970 (Moominvalley in November). As well as writing and illustrating this delightful series she also produced a long-running Moomin comic strip which was subsequently taken over by her brother Lars when Tove gave it up to concentrate on her novels and short stories for adults.

tovejanssonstudio  Finn_Family  saari19In 2014 the centenary of Jansson’s birth was celebrated with much fanfare. For more information on Tove Jansson’s life and work as a writer and artist check out the fine links below:

Brief biography which appears on official Moomin site.

Tove Jansson Virtual Museum and Life Story

Moomin iOs and Android games

moomin characters

Which Moomin character are you most like? Take the Moomin character personality test.

2016 Reading Challenge. Are You Up For It?


Last year (2015) I manged to complete my Goodreads, Reading Challenge 2015, ploughing my way through 33 books; fiction, non-fiction and even some graphic novels for the first time. Check out what I read last year below using their nifty Reading Challenge Widget which I displayed on this very blog for all to see. I’ve upped my goal by 2 books to 35 for the year and I am once again keeping tabs on myself via Goodreads.

If you fancy taking a simple challenge yourself, check out this Pinterest page above with some excellent prompts for what to read in 2016.

Remember to check in here to see how I’m doing throughout the year.

Read what you love, love what you read.

 

2015 reading chalenge boks part 1 reading challenge books part 2

 

How Much Media Do Kids and Teens Consume Each Day?


So, how much screen time is too much? Exactly what are the youngsters watching, doing and how often?

Common Sense Media has released the results of their research into the screen and media usage patterns of kids, tweens and teens.

Tweens, Teens, and Screens: What Our New Research Uncovers

By taking a “census” of kids’ media use, Common Sense’s new study quantifies screen use, identifies unique types of users, and uncovers patterns that could spark improvements in content, access, and learning.
Key Findings Include:
  • It’s not your imagination — media use is off the charts.
  • There is a wide diversity in screen media use.
  • Low-income kids lack access. 
  • Boys’ and girls’ media preferences are very different.
  • Social media use is big — but maybe not super fun. 
  • Everyone can be a maker, but not many are.

Read the whole report here.

 

 

Are You Up for the Challenge?


reading challenges

It is traditional for people to make New Year’s resolutions at the start of a new year and I am as guilty as the next person in not always managing to adhere to these worthy pledges for the entire 12 months. That said, last year I pledged to read 30 books and tracked my progress on Goodreads, using their nifty Reading Challenge Widget which I displayed on this very blog for all to see. I didn’t quite make my target, just coming up short by a few books (I managed 25). This year I am aiming to repeat the process, I’ve upped my goal by 1 book to 31 for the year and I am once again keeping tabs on myself via Goodreads.

If you fancy taking a simple challenge yourself, check out this Pinterest page with literally dozens of sites offering a multitude of different reading challenges to suit all abilities, tastes and interests.

Remember to check in here to see how I’m doing throughout the year.

Read what you love, love what you read.

Reading High End Fiction Makes You a Better Person?


New research recently published in the journal Science has shown that reading literary fiction enhances a person’s empathy, the ability to understand another person’s point of view. Read the whole article from the Sydney morning herald below.

Read Whole Article Here20140108-202116.jpg

The abstract from the original article summarises the findings;

“Understanding others’ mental states is a crucial skill that enables the complex social relationships that characterize human societies. Yet little research has investigated what fosters this skill, which is known as Theory of Mind (ToM), in adults. We present five experiments showing that reading literary fiction led to better performance on tests of affective ToM (experiments 1 to 5) and cognitive ToM (experiments 4 and 5) compared with reading nonfiction (experiments 1), popular fiction (experiments 2 to 5), or nothing at all (experiments 2 and 5). Specifically, these results show that reading literary fiction temporarily enhances ToM. More broadly, they suggest that ToM may be influenced by engagement with works of art.”

 

Young Adult What To Read Next InfoGraphic


Feel like doing some independent reading but you just can’t decide what to read next? Check out this excellent ‘Young Adult What To Read Next Flowchart’ for some great suggestions. As we are in Australia you can just ignore the “Summer Reading” bit. Summer, Winter, Autumn, Spring, Term time, holidays; all great times to do a bit of reading.

The Young Adult Summer Reading Flowchart

Brought to you by
Teach.com

Read what you like, like what you read!

Website of the Week: Essential Books For Kids and Teens


13-17 Year Olds Reding GuideThis week’s Website of the Week is Essential Books For Kids and Teens brought to you by the excellent Common Sense Media Site. This online reading guide provides very short descriptions of tried and tested, popular reads for all ages, abilities and interests. The guide is divided into three age levels; ages 2-6, ages 7-12 and ages 13-17. Stuck for something good to read, then check these suggestions out.

Download the PDF guide below.

Common Sense Media essential_books_guide_13-17