2015 Edublog Awards Nominations Now Open


You can nominate the Cabra Senior Library Blog here. Look for the best Library/Librarian blog category. We have been fortunate enough to make the Edublog Awards shortlist for the last 3 years running. Let’s make it number 4!

2015 edublog awards banner

Nominations for the 2015 Edublogs Educational Blogging Awards have now opened. You have till Wednesday 2 December to nominate your favourite educational blogs in any or all of the following categories.
So go nominate your favorite blogs, twitterers, community sites, videos, podcasts and more… for 2015:

The Edublog Awards started in 2004 in response to community concerns relating to how schools, districts and educational institutions were blocking access of learner and teacher blog sites for educational purposes.  The purpose of the Edublog awards is promote and demonstrate the educational values of these social media.

Working together, we create an invaluable resource of the best-of-the-best on the web!

2015 Categories

Nominations are open from now through Wednesday, December 2nd.

We have decided for 2015 to focus exclusively on blogs in education, so you may notice a few categories from previous years that aren’t included. This will allow us to spend more time reviewing all nominations for a more thorough voting round.

  • Best new blog
  • Best group blog
  • Best class blog
  • Best student blog
  • Best ed tech / resource sharing blog
  • Best teacher blog
  • Best library / librarian blog
  • Best administrator blog
  • Most influential blog post of the year
  • Best individual tweeter
  • Best individual blog

Don’t forget to make your nominations here!

My nominations for 2015 are:

 

 

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Research in Context Database Now Available


The Cabra Library is now able to offer students and staff access to another excellent collection of reference information. It is called Research in Context Database and it offers comprehensive detailed  information on just about every topic you could think of. You can access an incredible wealth of information on most topics and view or download these eBooks for later use in much the same way as the Gale Virtual Reference Database GVRL database. For a comprehensive set of guides on using this new research tool click here.

The Research in Context Database covers the following broad subject areas: Click here for the full list.

You will need a username and password to access the site, please ask your Homeroom Teacher for this. Access this resource and many others from the “Link Favourites” on the right hand side of our Access-It Library Catalogue.

For an overview and tips & tricks on using GVRL check out the video tutorials below:

Gale Virtual Reference Library Now Available


The Cabra Library is now able to offer students and staff access to another excellent collection of reference information. It is called Gale Virtual Reference Library (GVRL) and it offers comprehensive detailed  information on just about every topic you could think of. You can access an incredible wealth of information on most topics and view or download these eBooks for later use, keyword searching…

GVRL is arranged into the following broad subject areas:

You will need a username and password to access the site, please ask your Homeroom Teacher for this. Access this resource and many others from the “Link Favourites” on the right hand side of our Access-It Library Catalogue.

For an overview and tips & tricks on using GVRL check out the video tutorials below:

St. Patrick’s Day Today, March 17


Today, March 17th is St. Patrick’s Day. So, just who was St. Patrick I hear you ask?

Saint Patrick is the patron saint and national apostle of Ireland. St Patrick is credited with bringing christianity to Ireland. Most of what is known about him comes from his two works; the Confessio, a spiritual autobiography, and his Epistola, a denunciation of British mistreatment of Irish christians. Saint Patrick described himself as a “most humble-minded man, pouring forth a continuous paean of thanks to his Maker for having chosen him as the instrument whereby multitudes who had worshipped idols and unclean things had become the people of God.”

Many folk ask the question ‘Why is the Shamrock the National Flower of Ireland ?’ The reason is that St. Patrick used it to explain the Holy Trinity to the pagans. Saint Patrick is believed to have been born in the late fourth century, and is often confused with Palladius, a bishop who was sent by Pope Celestine in 431 to be the first bishop to the Irish believers in Christ.

Saint Patrick is most known for driving the snakes from Ireland. It is true there are no snakes in Ireland, but there probably never have been – the island was separated from the rest of the continent at the end of the Ice Age. As in many old pagan religions, serpent symbols were common and often worshipped. Driving the snakes from Ireland was probably symbolic of putting an end to that pagan practice. While not the first to bring christianity to Ireland, it is Patrick who is said to have encountered the Druids at Tara and abolished their pagan rites. The story holds that he converted the warrior chiefs and princes, baptizing them and thousands of their subjects in the “Holy Wells” that still bear this name.

There are several accounts of Saint Patrick’s death. One says that Patrick died at Saul, Downpatrick, Ireland, on March 17, 460 A.D. His jawbone was preserved in a silver shrine and was often requested in times of childbirth, epileptic fits, and as a preservative against the “evil eye.” Another account says that St. Patrick ended his days at Glastonbury, England and was buried there. The Chapel of St. Patrick still exists as part of Glastonbury Abbey. Today, many Catholic places of worship all around the world are named after St. Patrick, including cathedrals in New York and Dublin.

People with Irish heritage the world over celebrate St. Patrick’s Day today, March 17. Some calculations place the total population of people with predominantly Irish ancestry at over 100 million people. That’s over 15 times the current population of Ireland which stood at 6.4 million in 2011. At last count (2011 Australian Census) there were over 2 million Australians reporting Irish Ancestry; that’s just over 10% of the total population and of this number a little over 12% were first generation Irish immigrants to Australia.

Cabra Dominican College is of course intricately linked with Ireland through the founding Dominican Sisters. In 1868, at the invitation of the Bishop of Adelaide, seven Dominican sisters came to South Australia and opened a school for both boarders and day students in Franklin Street, Adelaide.

In 1886, the boarders moved to a new school, the present Cabra Dominican College.  The new site, now a busy suburban area, was then regarded as country, being a large area of bare, unoccupied land, somewhere to the south. Because the Sisters had come from Cabra, one of the leading educational establishments in Ireland, it was decided to call the new convent and school, Cabra.

Read more of the Founding Sisters’ story here.

Read St. Patrick in his own words here.

The Irish Diaspora: Global Irish Site and Wikipedia Article

Today is Safer Internet Day for 2015


SID 2015 banner

Safer Internet Day (SID) is organised by Insafe in February of each year to promote safer and more responsible use of online technology and mobile phones, especially among children and young people across the world.

This year’s theme is “Let’s create a better internet together”.

Check out the links below for more Cyber-safety tips and tricks.

Cyber Safety Resources from Common Sense Media

Cyber-Ethics from iKeepSafe

2014 Edublog Awards Nominations Now Open


You can nominate the Cabra Senior Library Blog here. Look for the best Library/Librarian blog category.

Nominations for the 2014 Edublogs Educational Blogging Awards have now opened. You have till Monday 24 November to nominate your favourite educational blogs in any or all of the following categories.
So go nominate your favorite blogs, twitterers, community sites, videos, podcasts and more… for 2014:

 

My nominations for 2014 are:

Best teacher blog

Gryphon Science Blog: http://gryphonscience.com/

Best ed tech / resource sharing blog
Phil Bradley’s I want to blog: http://www.philb.com/iwantto.htm

Best library / librarian blog

The Daring Librarian: http://www.thedaringlibrarian.com/

To nominate your own favourite educational blogs find go here:

October is International School Library Month


ISLM 2013Welcome back to the start of Term 4 and just in time to help us celebrate International School Library Month. The ISLM Theme for 2014 is Your School Library: Mind-Map Central.

This is a great opportunity to think about what makes your school library great. Please leave us a comment or suggestion about our libraries. The three most interesting will receive a prize. We hope you all had a relaxing break and got a lot of reading done. Don’t forget to return or renew any books that are now overdue.

 

 

 

Read what you like, like what you read.

 

 

 

EduTech 2014 Starts Today


EduTech 2014

EduTech 2104, starts today. EduTECH® is Australasia’s largest annual education technology conference and exhibition. In 2014, EduTECH® will host 9 conferences, 8 masterclasses, 5000+ attendees, official event dinner for 800 guests, 200+ exhibitors and free seminars for exhibition visitors. EduTECH® is the only event that brings together the entire education and training sector (primary, secondary, tertiary, higher education and workplace learning) plus libraries, plus government, plus suppliers…all under one roof.

The event is held in Brisbane and will allow education professionals from all sectors to see what the latest trends, ideas and technologies around education mean for their own practices and workplace.

 

 

 

 

St. Patrick’s Day Today, March 17


March 17th is St. Patrick’s Day. So, just who was St. Patrick anyway?

The stained glass image of St Patrick hails from Cabinteely church, Dublin

The stained glass image of St Patrick hails from Cabinteely church, Dublin

Saint Patrick is the patron saint and national apostle of Ireland. St Patrick is credited with bringing christianity to Ireland. Most of what is known about him comes from his two works; the Confessio, a spiritual autobiography, and his Epistola, a denunciation of British mistreatment of Irish christians. Saint Patrick described himself as a “most humble-minded man, pouring forth a continuous paean of thanks to his Maker for having chosen him as the instrument whereby multitudes who had worshipped idols and unclean things had become the people of God.”

Many folk ask the question ‘Why is the Shamrock the National Flower of Ireland ?’ The reason is that St. Patrick used it to explain the Holy Trinity to the pagans. Saint Patrick is believed to have been born in the late fourth century, and is often confused with Palladius, a bishop who was sent by Pope Celestine in 431 to be the first bishop to the Irish believers in Christ.

Saint Patrick is most known for driving the snakes from Ireland. It is true there are no snakes in Ireland, but there probably never have been – the island was separated from the rest of the continent at the end of the Ice Age. As in many old pagan religions, serpent symbols were common and often worshipped. Driving the snakes from Ireland was probably symbolic of putting an end to that pagan practice. While not the first to bring christianity to Ireland, it is Patrick who is said to have encountered the Druids at Tara and abolished their pagan rites. The story holds that he converted the warrior chiefs and princes, baptizing them and thousands of their subjects in the “Holy Wells” that still bear this name.

There are several accounts of Saint Patrick’s death. One says that Patrick died at Saul, Downpatrick, Ireland, on March 17, 460 A.D. His jawbone was preserved in a silver shrine and was often requested in times of childbirth, epileptic fits, and as a preservative against the “evil eye.” Another account says that St. Patrick ended his days at Glastonbury, England and was buried there. The Chapel of St. Patrick still exists as part of Glastonbury Abbey. Today, many Catholic places of worship all around the world are named after St. Patrick, including cathedrals in New York and Dublin.

People with Irish heritage the world over celebrate St. Patrick’s Day today, March 17. Some calculations place the total population of people with predominantly Irish ancestry at over 100 million people. That’s over 15 times the current population of Ireland which stood at 6.4 million in 2011. At last count (2011 Australian Census) there were over 2 million Australians reporting Irish Ancestry; that’s just over 10% of the total population and of this number a little over 12% were first generation Irish immigrants to Australia.

Cabra Dominican College is of course intricately linked with Ireland through the founding Dominican Sisters. In 1868, at the invitation of the Bishop of Adelaide, seven Dominican sisters came to South Australia and opened a school for both boarders and day students in Franklin Street, Adelaide.

In 1886, the boarders moved to a new school, the present Cabra Dominican College.  The new site, now a busy suburban area, was then regarded as country, being a large area of bare, unoccupied land, somewhere to the south. Because the Sisters had come from Cabra, one of the leading educational establishments in Ireland, it was decided to call the new convent and school, Cabra.

Read more of the Founding Sisters’ story here.

Read St. Patrick in his own words here.

The Irish Diaspora: Global Irish Site and Wikipedia Article

2013 Edublog Awards Nominations Now Open


EdublogsEdublog Awards 2013

Nominations for the 2013 Edublogs Educational Blogging Awards have now opened. You have till Sunday 1 December to nominate your favourite educational blogs in any or all of the following categories.
So go nominate your favorite blogs, twitterers, community sites, videos, podcasts and more… for 2013:

My nominations for 2013 are:

Best Group Blog

Gryphon Science Blog: http://gryphonscience.com/

Best teacher blog

Cabra Dominican College Art Blog: http://cabracollegeart.wordpress.com/

Best ed tech / resource sharing blog
Phil Bradley’s I want to blog: http://www.philb.com/iwantto.htm

Best library / librarian blog

Information Tyrannosaur: http://andyburkhardt.com/

To nominate your own favourite educational blogs find go here: